Himachal Pradesh Jewelry

The jewelry of Himachal Pradesh is completely different. Elliptical anklets, strong bangles with a metal head, hair ornaments, leaf ornaments shaped like a leaf, and ornaments with symbols of the mother goddess are some of the most beautiful pieces of Himachal Pradesh.

Like other tribal societies in India, the traditional style of clothing and dress in Himachal Pradesh includes ornaments for all body parts. Himachal Pradesh used to be ruled by Rajputs so jewelry designs often incorporate the traditional Rajasthan style of Meenakari (carvings made of gold and silver). Deep blue and green colors were often used in enamellings. Over the years, traditional Rajasthan designs have been influenced by Tibetan designs with local flowers and animals. The area is home to Buddhists from Lahul and Spiti, Hindus Gujjar and Bakarwal nomads, as well as Hindus from Kullu and Chambamba. Many of the decorative designs here are of Indian origin mixed with Tibetan ones. Many natural motifs inspired by nature: lotus flower, pipal tree leaves, tiger head. One of the most popular ornaments in Himachal Pradesh is the head ornament. The most common is the medium-sized braid that hangs from the hairline and silver chains that run on both sides up to the ear. The collection of attractive features on the forehead is called shringar-patti. It includes the hem worn on either side of the face, consisting of a star or geometric-shaped pieces connected. It is also equated with pipal leaves or stars or drops. There are also placards or crescent-shaped placards that are sometimes inserted, which are hung on the forehead.

Shringar Patti:

The Stringing patti is worn on the forehead and includes a fringe worn on either side of the face, consisting of a star or geometric-shaped pieces connected. It is also equated with pipal leaves or stars or drops. There are also placards or crescent-shaped placards that are sometimes inserted, which are hung on the forehead.

Chudamani:

Chudamani is a headdress made of lotus, which is worn with hair extensions. The Kangan is a candle that looks thin and clear in its shape, but extends to both ends and is engraved on the heads of tigers or elephants etc. Women in the region of Gaddi also wear silver jewelry called chi-tikka. Chiri says bird in local language.

Khul-Kantaie:

Fascinating jewelry is worn by married women from Kinnaur. It is called khul-kantaie and consists of a few earrings, usually twenty, hundreds of which are worn hanging down the hair over the ears covered with a piece of cloth.

Digra:

Another special decoration here is the digra, an embellished shawl pin that contains a finely embossed silver cover and a silver chain to connect the two corners facing the digra. Another amazing decoration is the mulmentho, a chain that encloses with a number of leaflets.

Chandramalang:

Chandramalang is a necklace popular with the women of Paar. Chokers are called kach, made of silver beads and triangular plates and collars-like hansali. All women wear heavy anklets, belts and bracelets of silver or kare, sturdy or full of shellac. These are often seen standing with the heads of crocodiles or the heads of lions. In Lahaul-Spiti-inspired Tibetan, ornaments are filled with precious stones such as coral, turquoise, amber and mother-of-pearl. The women of the Spiti region wore a silver shawl fibula with three circular forms depicting three Buddhist values.

Chak:

Chak decoration is worn on the head. It is a silver-headed ornament with twelve types: in which many beads revolve around the edges with silver chains in the chak-boron-wala; where the insertion of the colored crust is made into chak-meenawala; where two homes on the side of the head are connected to the main chak by chak-phul. This decoration is usually invisible as it is covered with a head covering.

Many ancient designs are no longer seen in the modern world but can be seen in museums such as the Kangra Art Museum in Dharamsala, the State Museum in Shimla and the Bhuri Singh Museum in Chambamba.

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